Some Thoughts on Music from Ephesians 5:19 and Colossians 3:16

Services

Sunday - 930 Morning Worship - 1115 Sunday School | Wednesday - 7PM Prayer Meeting & Bible Study

by: Pastor David Huffstutler

06/05/2022

0

First, congregational singing is imperative. Ephesians 5:19 details how the congregation engages in Spirit-filled worship (cf. Eph 5:18), and Colossians 3:16 focuses on how the word of Christ dwells richly among the body in its singing. Singing is an imperative means of how to let the word of Christ dwell richly in us and how to live a Spirit-filled life. 

Second, worship is not entertainment, a performance by some for the enjoyment of a congregation that never participates. However a congregation is led to worship by its pastors, it should be clear that everyone is worshipping together. 

Third, congregational singing is involves our inner man. Each individual accepts the word of Christ and desires to have Him dwell richly in himself and among the congregation. Singing involves songs that are spiritual and thus led by the Spirit within. Singing and making melody are with hearts motivated by thankfulness. Singing must be guided in all wisdom. A good hymn and its music do not distract or dull the mind and heart from understanding the Scriptural statements being sung. 

Fourth, Christians should be suspect of incorporating an unbelieving world’s styles of music into their Spirit-filled worship of God. While some of what the world produces in music may reflect the common grace of God, most of it does not, and what could otherwise be good is often tainted by the sinful lifestyles and associations of the artists. Lines have to be drawn somewhere, and it is unwise to use or listen to so-called Christian music that obviously uses the world’s pop-style melodies, seductive styles, or driving syncopation. At our church, we have a pastor or another godly man lead the music, and we simply use a piano to accompany our singing. When in doubt, we simply use time-honored hymnody that is free of cultural baggage. 

Fifth, there is variety in congregational song—psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. Though these terms overlap, they may be distinct as well. The use of psalms indicates that the OT psalms should be sung as appropriate, and hymns and songs indicate that Christians may wisely craft their own texts and melodies as necessary and helpful. 

Sixth, the use of wisdom indicates that discretion is necessary in considering what a text says, how songs are sung, and the congregation itself. Many texts and melodies should be avoided if they do not help a congregation let the word of Christ dwell more richly among them. 

Eighth, the terms psalm and sing (from psallō) imply that instruments may be used, the chief instrument being is the voice itself. 

Ninth, the term psalm indicates that we already have a songbook of 150 selections for congregational worship. The psalms are also examples for hymns and songs in showing what a text and its literary features should be. Further instruction for worship can be found in the psalms, and the Bible offers other examples of hymns and songs as well.

First, congregational singing is imperative. Ephesians 5:19 details how the congregation engages in Spirit-filled worship (cf. Eph 5:18), and Colossians 3:16 focuses on how the word of Christ dwells richly among the body in its singing. Singing is an imperative means of how to let the word of Christ dwell richly in us and how to live a Spirit-filled life. 

Second, worship is not entertainment, a performance by some for the enjoyment of a congregation that never participates. However a congregation is led to worship by its pastors, it should be clear that everyone is worshipping together. 

Third, congregational singing is involves our inner man. Each individual accepts the word of Christ and desires to have Him dwell richly in himself and among the congregation. Singing involves songs that are spiritual and thus led by the Spirit within. Singing and making melody are with hearts motivated by thankfulness. Singing must be guided in all wisdom. A good hymn and its music do not distract or dull the mind and heart from understanding the Scriptural statements being sung. 

Fourth, Christians should be suspect of incorporating an unbelieving world’s styles of music into their Spirit-filled worship of God. While some of what the world produces in music may reflect the common grace of God, most of it does not, and what could otherwise be good is often tainted by the sinful lifestyles and associations of the artists. Lines have to be drawn somewhere, and it is unwise to use or listen to so-called Christian music that obviously uses the world’s pop-style melodies, seductive styles, or driving syncopation. At our church, we have a pastor or another godly man lead the music, and we simply use a piano to accompany our singing. When in doubt, we simply use time-honored hymnody that is free of cultural baggage. 

Fifth, there is variety in congregational song—psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs. Though these terms overlap, they may be distinct as well. The use of psalms indicates that the OT psalms should be sung as appropriate, and hymns and songs indicate that Christians may wisely craft their own texts and melodies as necessary and helpful. 

Sixth, the use of wisdom indicates that discretion is necessary in considering what a text says, how songs are sung, and the congregation itself. Many texts and melodies should be avoided if they do not help a congregation let the word of Christ dwell more richly among them. 

Eighth, the terms psalm and sing (from psallō) imply that instruments may be used, the chief instrument being is the voice itself. 

Ninth, the term psalm indicates that we already have a songbook of 150 selections for congregational worship. The psalms are also examples for hymns and songs in showing what a text and its literary features should be. Further instruction for worship can be found in the psalms, and the Bible offers other examples of hymns and songs as well.

cancel save