The Resurrection of Jesus in the OT

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Sunday - 930 Morning Worship - 1115 Sunday School | Wednesday - 7PM Prayer Meeting & Bible Study

by: Pastor David Huffstutler

04/04/2021

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Isaiah spoke of Jesus in Isaiah 52:13–53:12, with

thoughts of the resurrection in Isaiah 53:10. Hinting

at His death, Jesus would be “like a lamb that is led

to the slaughter” (Isa 53:7), and, indeed, He would be

“taken away” and “cut off out of the land of the living” (Isa 53:8). He

would die and lie in “His grave,” being made “an offering for guilt” (Isa

53:9–10). Nonetheless, Isaiah promised of Jesus that “He shall see His

offspring” and that the Father would “prolong His days” (Isa 53:10).

Though Isaiah does not specifically mention the resurrection, it is

obviously implied between the prophecies of the death of the Messiah and

His prolonged days thereafter.

Psalm 16:10 gives another clear prophecy of Jesus’ resurrection.

Speaking of Christ, David promised, “For you will not abandon my soul

to Sheol, or let your holy one see corruption.” Similar to how Abraham

believed that God would have raised Isaac from the dead because of His

promise of Abraham’s descendants through him (Heb 11:17–19), David

knew that his Descendant would one day rule forever, which meant for

Him that Sheol and corruption would be overcome by a resurrection (Ps

16:10; see also Acts 2:30–31; 13:34–37).

Many OT texts could be added to the two above.1 In summarizing the

gospel, Paul pointed out of Jesus “that he was raised on the third day in

accordance with the Scriptures” (1 Cor 15:4). If only Paul could have told

us which Scriptures!

Similarly, when Jesus spoke to the two disciples on the road to Emmaus

after His resurrection, Jesus rebuked them for their failure to believe in

His resurrection. (They did not recognize it was Him at the time; cf. Luke

24:31.) Luke 24:25–27 states, “And he said to them, ‘O foolish ones, and

slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken! Was it not

necessary that the Christ should suffer these things and enter into his

glory?’ And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he interpreted to

them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself.”

We wish we could know from Jesus Himself what Moses and the

prophets had to say of His resurrection, a necessary event for Him to

“enter in His glory.” At the same time, we at least know what some OT

passages say of His resurrection. We can also see the story of the

resurrection and its significance in the NT. Paul speaks to both in

1 Corinthians 15:20–22: “But in fact Christ has been raised from the

dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. For as by a man came

death, by a man has come also the resurrection of the dead. For as in

Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive.”

Praise be to God for the resurrection of Christ, a picture and guarantee of

our resurrection to come!

All quotes ESV. Articles by Pastor Huffstutler are at davidhuffstutler.com.

Isaiah spoke of Jesus in Isaiah 52:13–53:12, with

thoughts of the resurrection in Isaiah 53:10. Hinting

at His death, Jesus would be “like a lamb that is led

to the slaughter” (Isa 53:7), and, indeed, He would be

“taken away” and “cut off out of the land of the living” (Isa 53:8). He

would die and lie in “His grave,” being made “an offering for guilt” (Isa

53:9–10). Nonetheless, Isaiah promised of Jesus that “He shall see His

offspring” and that the Father would “prolong His days” (Isa 53:10).

Though Isaiah does not specifically mention the resurrection, it is

obviously implied between the prophecies of the death of the Messiah and

His prolonged days thereafter.

Psalm 16:10 gives another clear prophecy of Jesus’ resurrection.

Speaking of Christ, David promised, “For you will not abandon my soul

to Sheol, or let your holy one see corruption.” Similar to how Abraham

believed that God would have raised Isaac from the dead because of His

promise of Abraham’s descendants through him (Heb 11:17–19), David

knew that his Descendant would one day rule forever, which meant for

Him that Sheol and corruption would be overcome by a resurrection (Ps

16:10; see also Acts 2:30–31; 13:34–37).

Many OT texts could be added to the two above.1 In summarizing the

gospel, Paul pointed out of Jesus “that he was raised on the third day in

accordance with the Scriptures” (1 Cor 15:4). If only Paul could have told

us which Scriptures!

Similarly, when Jesus spoke to the two disciples on the road to Emmaus

after His resurrection, Jesus rebuked them for their failure to believe in

His resurrection. (They did not recognize it was Him at the time; cf. Luke

24:31.) Luke 24:25–27 states, “And he said to them, ‘O foolish ones, and

slow of heart to believe all that the prophets have spoken! Was it not

necessary that the Christ should suffer these things and enter into his

glory?’ And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he interpreted to

them in all the Scriptures the things concerning himself.”

We wish we could know from Jesus Himself what Moses and the

prophets had to say of His resurrection, a necessary event for Him to

“enter in His glory.” At the same time, we at least know what some OT

passages say of His resurrection. We can also see the story of the

resurrection and its significance in the NT. Paul speaks to both in

1 Corinthians 15:20–22: “But in fact Christ has been raised from the

dead, the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep. For as by a man came

death, by a man has come also the resurrection of the dead. For as in

Adam all die, so also in Christ shall all be made alive.”

Praise be to God for the resurrection of Christ, a picture and guarantee of

our resurrection to come!

All quotes ESV. Articles by Pastor Huffstutler are at davidhuffstutler.com.

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